Official Water Cooler Recipes/Libations Thread

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New postby Paesan33 on Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:28 am

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a simple solution

New postby Baldo on Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:55 am

send out all the boats to display to those agressive calamari types vast amounts of tartar and cocktail sauce as well garlic ! :lol: :lol: :lol: :wink:

frutti di mare for everybody!!!!!! Mangia! :lol:
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Regional Delicacies

New postby clockwork bluejay on Sat Aug 18, 2007 12:49 pm

In my never-ending quest to discuss topics other than politics ("Bush is the source of all evil in the universe" vs "Clinton caused 9/11, the deficit, and the use of steroids in sports"), I noticed in this month's National G an article about regional foods: local foods confined to micro-regions such as half-smokes in DC and toasted ravioli in St. Louis.
The on-line version:
http://www7.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/ ... foods.html

These are not items that one particular region makes particularly well (bagels in NY or brats in Milwaukee) but food that is really only known in a certain area of the country. Buffalo Wings once met this description before they became ubiquitous. Does anyone have anyone have any delicacies to add to the National G.'s list?

I would add the "spiedie" a delicious marinated meat sandwich native to Binghamton, NY and boiled peanuts, a rather nasty (IMHO) bar snack/appetizer in South Carolina.
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Cincinnati Chile

New postby Baldo on Sat Aug 18, 2007 12:57 pm

Which consists of chili served over spaghetti. Here are the details (including Cinnamon, Allspice and Cocoa in the chile :oops: )

Cincinnati Chili Recipe
1 large onion chopped
1 pound extra-lean ground beef
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon red (cayenne) pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tbsp unsweetened cocoa or 1/2 ounce grated unsweetened chocolate
1 (15-ounce) can tomato sauce
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1/2 cup water
1 (16-ounce) package uncooked dried spaghetti pasta
Toppings (see below)

In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, saute onion, ground beef, garlic, and chili powder until ground beef is slightly cooked. Add allspice, cinnamon, cumin, Cayenne pepper, salt, unsweetened cocoa or chocolate, tomato sauce, Worcestershire sauce, cider vinegar, and water. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, 1 1/2 hours. Remove from heat.

Cook spaghetti according to package directions and transfer onto individual serving plates (small oval plates are traditional).

Ladle chili over spaghetti and serve with toppings of your choice. Oyster crackers are served in a separate container on the side.

Cincinnati chili lovers order their chili by number. Two, Three, Four, or Five Way. Let your guest create their own final product.

Two-Way Chili: Chili served on spaghetti
Three-Way Chili: Additionally topped with shredded Cheddar cheese
Four-Way Chili: Additionally topped with chopped onions
Five-Way Chili: Additionally topped with kidney beans

I guess its an acquired taste :oops: :(
Last edited by Baldo on Sun Aug 19, 2007 1:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Here a local one from here in Connecticut - Clam Hash

New postby Baldo on Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:03 pm

Ingredients:
3 medium potatoes (about 1 pound)
1 dozen large chowder clams or 2 6-1/2 ounce cans of chopped cans, drained of most juice
1 rib celery, diced (about 1/3 cup)
1/2 bay leaf, thoroughly crushed
2 bunches scallions, chopped, including some of the greens (1/2 to 2/3 cup)
2-4 tablespoons cream
1/2 to 1 teaspoon salt, to taste
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon thyme
2-3 ounces salt pork, cut into small pieces Directions:
Peel and boil the potatoes until they can be pierced with a fork. Cool and dice.
Scrub the clam shells thoroughly clean. Place them in a kettle with about an inch of water with the celery and bay leaf. Cover and steam over medium heat about 15 minutes, or until the shells are open wide.
Remove the clams from the broth and when cool enough to handle, cut out the meat. Chop the clam meat into nuggets no bigger than peas. (If you are using canned clams, omit this step and omit the celery and bay leaf.)
Combine the chopped clams, potatoes, and scallions with enough cream so the mixture holds together but isn't wet. Stir in the seasonings.
In a 12-inch no-stick skillet, fry the salt pork over medium-high heat until the fat is rendered. Remove most of the "cracklin's" and reserve them.
Add the hash to the skillet of hot fat, flattening it into a patty. Fry 10-15 minutes until crusty. Flip and fry the other side 10-15 minutes. Garnish with cracklins if desired, or with a fried egg.

This recipe was invented locally when the chef's kids accidentally threw away the broth retrieved from a batch of clams that were destined to become clam chowder. Without the broth, there could be no chowder; and so they improvised and created hash.

It's actually quite good even for those who could not imagine having clams for breakfast.
Last edited by Baldo on Sat Aug 18, 2007 8:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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half smokes

New postby fan on Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:20 pm

Well, learn something new every day. I thought half smokes were common but just had regional names (e.g. hoagies & subs, over easy & once over light, etc.)

I'd order half smokes, get a weird look, and point to the polish sausages and be on my way. Guess my missle-shaped sandwich palette isn't too discerning.
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New postby Baldo on Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:29 pm

with regard to NYC and bagels - a variation of the bagel that is unique to NYC is the bialy A traditional bialy has a diameter of up to 6 inches and is a chewy yeast roll. Unlike a bagel, which is boiled before baking, a bialy is simply baked, and instead of a hole in the middle it has a depression. Before baking, this depression is filled with diced onions and other ingredients, including (depending on the recipe) garlic, poppy seeds, or bread crumbs. Once you have a bialy you'll never go back to bagels. :wink:

Bialys are very hard to find outside of NYC just like Egg Creams (which are native to Brooklyn) and consist of chocolate syrup, milk and seltzer (used to create a froth by bouncing the seltzer spray off the back of a spoon).
In order to do it right, you also have to find the old style spray bottle of seltzer.
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New postby finesse on Sat Aug 18, 2007 4:13 pm

egg creams are so good!
in regards to bagels, i have yet to find a good bagel outside of nyc or li
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Bialys have escaped!

New postby frauknees on Sat Aug 18, 2007 4:53 pm

Baldo wrote:with regard to NYC and bagels - a variation of the bagel that is unique to NYC is the bialy A traditional bialy has a diameter of up to 6 inches and is a chewy yeast roll. Unlike a bagel, which is boiled before baking, a bialy is simply baked, and instead of a hole in the middle it has a depression. Before baking, this depression is filled with diced onions and other ingredients, including (depending on the recipe) garlic, poppy seeds, or bread crumbs. Once you have a bialy you'll never go back to bagels. :wink:

Bialys are very hard to find outside of NYC just like Egg Creams (which are native to Brooklyn) and consist of chocolate syrup, milk and seltzer (used to create a froth by bouncing the seltzer spray off the back of a spoon).
In order to do it right, you also have to find the old style spray bottle of seltzer.


It turns out that our Wegmans in Fairfax (you know, Virginia -- south of the Mason-Dixon Line) carries bialys. They are exactly as you described. :wink:
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New postby CourtJester2 on Sat Aug 18, 2007 10:26 pm

Baldo wrote:with regard to NYC and bagels - a variation of the bagel that is unique to NYC is the bialy A traditional bialy has a diameter of up to 6 inches and is a chewy yeast roll. Unlike a bagel, which is boiled before baking, a bialy is simply baked, and instead of a hole in the middle it has a depression. Before baking, this depression is filled with diced onions and other ingredients, including (depending on the recipe) garlic, poppy seeds, or bread crumbs. Once you have a bialy you'll never go back to bagels. :wink:

Bialys are very hard to find outside of NYC just like Egg Creams (which are native to Brooklyn) and consist of chocolate syrup, milk and seltzer (used to create a froth by bouncing the seltzer spray off the back of a spoon).
In order to do it right, you also have to find the old style spray bottle of seltzer.


I would add that finding a good hard roll is difficult outside of New York or Long Island. It's probably what makes bacon, egg, and cheese the best in the northeast.
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Ballpark food in San Antonio

New postby oldjunkballer on Sun Aug 19, 2007 2:23 am

When I was in baseball (*gasp*!) many years ago, the concessionaire at VJ Keefe Stadium in San Antonio had a sandwich called a "Catcher's Mitt." It was ground beef, nacho cheese sauce, chili powder, and onions in pita bread, and it was fabulous. It also became quite popular in San Antonio, and if you got around town a little to the many outdoor fiestas the city throws (like the Mud Queen Festival, but that's for another thread) you'd see some lame attempts to reproduce it. But the imitations were never as good as the genuine article at the ballpark.

The club has since moved to a new stadium, the concessionaire, Candy Pena, has died, and I don't know if the club still serves that sandwich. But when Candy died, both of the local papers, the Express-News and the Light, carried good-sized obits of Candy Pena and credited him with inventing the sandwich.

By the way, wasn't Bill Clinton responsible for Kevin Costner's cost overruns in the production of "Waterworld"?
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Re: Ballpark food in San Antonio

New postby clockwork bluejay on Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:41 am

oldjunkballer wrote:By the way, wasn't Bill Clinton responsible for Kevin Costner's cost overruns in the production of "Waterworld"?


Yes, but on the other hand, he did issue an executive order banning the making of Ishtar 2 and Hudson Hawk: The Sequel, thus single-handedly saving Hollywood and the global enviornment. :lol:

But no more politics in this thread... :lol:
Last edited by clockwork bluejay on Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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wasn't Bill also involved

New postby Baldo on Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:52 am

in Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate? :oops: :lol: :lol:
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Quite right

New postby Baldo on Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:57 am

CourtJester2 wrote:I would add that finding a good hard roll is difficult outside of New York or Long Island. It's probably what makes bacon, egg, and cheese the best in the northeast.


I'm convinced that there are no true "hard rolls" outside of Long Island and the five boroughs.

Metro area bagels also have a harder crust, too.

I've been told by those in the the know that its the water used in the dough that makes for the harder crusts.
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Re: wasn't Bill also involved

New postby clockwork bluejay on Sun Aug 19, 2007 9:01 am

Baldo wrote:in Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate? :oops: :lol: :lol:


No, but Marshall Applewhite's Heavens's Gate was on Bill's watch...
Al Gore swears he had nothing to do it with it... :lol:
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New postby whollymoly on Sun Aug 19, 2007 10:53 am

We've always had true "hard rolls" up here. Construction crews would always want them in the AM - and, I DO mean in the AM. Like 5 or 6. When I was a callow youth, I was sent to get them from the closest diner, diners being the only places that had true hard rolls. Don't know where they got them.

At that time, "regular" coffee did NOT mean, as it does now, coffee with caffeine. All coffee was assumed to be with caffeine. That's what coffee is. If you wanted decaf, you asked for decaf, though that is still, to me, like drinking non-alcholic beer - an exercise similar to having tantric sex, i.e. without using your body.

No, "regular" coffee, at that time, in diners at least, meant coffee with cream and sugar. If you wanted black or any combination NOT cream and sugar, you stated the specs. Regular meant with cream and sugar. A little bit of history from whollymoly.
------------------------------------------------

Anybody got a good recipe for the peanut-oil deep fried turkey they have in the south at Thanksgiving ? Supposed to be really good.

Up here we roast turkey, of course.

Any such recipe, in its formulation and expression, should take into account the level of intelligence and the level of culinary skill of the asker, i.e., me
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"Regular" Coffee

New postby Baldo on Sun Aug 19, 2007 11:05 am

depends on where you are - in NYC and most of the Northeast "Regular" means with cream and sugar.

In parts of New England, Regular can be amended to "light and sweet" simply asking for more cream and sugar than "regular".

Ask for a "regular" coffee in Chicago and you'll get it black.

If you want a real laugh about coffee today - check out Jackie Mason's opinion

Jackie Mason on Starbucks- A Little Levity

"You want coffee in a coffee shop, that's 60 cents. But at Starbucks, Cafe Latte: $3.50. Cafe Creamier: $4.50. Cafe Suisse: $9.50. For each French word, another four dollars.

Why does a little cream in coffee make it worth $3.50? Go into any coffee shop; they'll give you all the cream you want until you're blue in the face. Forty-million people are walking around in coffee shops with jars of cream: "Here's all the cream you want!" And it's still 60 cents. You know why? Because it's called "coffee." If it's Cafe Latte $4.50.

You want cinnamon in your coffee? Ask for cinnamon in a coffee shop; they'll give you all the cinnamon you want. Do they ask you for more money because it's cinnamon? It's the same price for cinnamon in your coffee as for coffee without cinnamon - 60 cents, that's it. But not in Starbucks. Over here, it's Cinnamonnier - $9.50.

You want a refill in a regular coffee shop, they'll give you all the refills you want until you drop dead. You can come in when you're 27 and keep drinking coffee until you're 98. And they'll start begging you: "Here, you want more coffee, you want more, you want more?" Do you know that you can't get a refill at Starbucks? A refill is a dollar fifty. Two refills, $4.50. Three refills, $19.50. So, for four cups of coffee -- $35.00. And it's burnt coffee. It's burnt coffee at Starbucks, let's be honest about it. If you get burnt coffee in a coffee shop, you call a cop. You say, "It's the bottom of the pot. I don't drink from the bottom of the pot. But when it's burnt at Starbucks, they say,"Oh, it's a blend. It's a blend." It's a special bean from Argentina....." The bean is in your head.

And there're no chairs in those Starbucks. Instead, they have these high stools. You ever see these stools? You haven't been on a chair that high since you were two. Seventy-three year old Jews are climbing and climbing to get to the top of the chair. And when they get tothe top, they can't even drink the coffee because there's 12 people around one little table, and everybody's saying, "Excuse me, excuse me, excuse me, excuse me..... Then they can't get off the chair. Old Jews are begging Gentiles, "Mister, could you get me off this?"

Do you remember what a cafeteria was? In poor neighborhoods all over this country, they went to a cafeteria because there were no waiters and no service. And so poor people could save money on a tip. Cafeterias didn't have regular tables or chairs either. They gave coffee to you in a cardboard cup. So because of that you paid less for the coffee. You got less, so you paid less. It's all the same at Starbucks - no chairs, no service, a cardboard cup for your coffee-except in Starbucks, the less you get, the more it costs. By the time they give you nothing, it's worth four times as much. Am I exaggerating?

Did you ever try to buy a cookie in Starbucks? Buy a cookie in a regular coffee shop. You can tear down a building with that cookie. And the whole cookie is 60 cents. At Starbucks, you're going to have to hire a detective to find that cookie, and it's $9.50. And you can't put butter on it because they want extra. Do you know that if you buy a bagel, you pay extra for cream cheese in Starbucks? Cream cheese, another 60 cents. A knife to put it on, 32 cents. If it reaches the bagel, 48 cents. That bagel costs you $3.12. And they don't give you the butter or the cream cheese. They don't give it to you. They tell you where it is. "Oh, you want butter? It's over there. Cream cheese? Over here. Sugar? Sugar is here." Now you become your own waiter. You walk around with a tray. "I'll take the cookie. Where's the butter? The butter's here. Where's the cream cheese? The cream cheese is there." You walked around for an hour and a half selecting items, and then the guy at the cash register has a glass in front of him that says "Tips." You're waiting on tables for an hour, and you owe him money.

Then there's a sign that says please clean it up when you're finished. They don't give you a waiter or a busboy. Now you've become the janitor. Now you have to start cleaning up the place. Old Jews are walking around cleaning up Starbucks. "Oh, he's got dirt too? Wait, I'll clean this up." They clean up the place for an hour and a half. If I said to you, "I have a great idea for a business. I'll open a whole new type of a coffee shop. Instead of 60 cents for coffee I'll charge $2.50, $3.50, $4.50, and $5.50. Not only that, I'll have no tables, no chairs, no water, no busboy, and you'll clean it up for 20 minutes after you're finished."

Would you say to me, "That's the greatest idea for a business I ever heard! We can open a chain of these all over the world!" No, you would put me right into a sanitarium. Starbucks can only get away with it because they have French titles for everything, Nazi [deleted] sons-of-a-[deleted]. And I say this with the highest respect, because I don't like to talk about people."



Mason is the quintessential Noo Yawkah. :lol: :lol:
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Deep-fried turkey

New postby frauknees on Sun Aug 19, 2007 11:35 am

whollymoly wrote:Anybody got a good recipe for the peanut-oil deep fried turkey they have in the south at Thanksgiving ? Supposed to be really good.

Up here we roast turkey, of course.

Any such recipe, in its formulation and expression, should take into account the level of intelligence and the level of culinary skill of the asker, i.e., me



We did one several years ago, and they are very good. I'm not sure you really need much of a recipe. There are various marinades you can inject into the turkey to give it a different taste -- Cajun, herb, etc. -- but you could also just go with plain turkey and not go too far wrong. (The injectors are just that -- really big needles and syringes.) The turkey cooks really fast, and does end up moist with a nice crunchy skin.

We would pass on a couple of observations, however. First, make sure the turkey is completely thawed (this should be sort of obvious). Otherwise, it can cause all kinds of splatter when the frozen spots explode. Second, the directions (at least the ones that came with our fryer) said to determine the amount of oil needed by putting the turkey in the fryer and filling it with water until the turkey was submerged. The amount of water used was then supposedly the amount of oil to use. These directions are WRONG!!!! They didn't account for the fact that oil expands A LOT when it is heated. You probably need at most 2/3 of the amount measured using the water. We ended up (veerrrrrrryyyyy carefully) removing extra oil with other cooking pots, and setting it aside to cool enough to do something with it.

A few final notes. It takes a lot of oil. The oil takes a long time to cool after you have cooked the turkey (although this may be less of a problem for you, what with living up in the Arctic Tundra and all). You then have a few gallons of used oil to do something with. You have to watch the turkey constantly.

Although the turkey was very good, we haven't tried it a second time because it is a hassle.

One last thing...a thought from der Junge's friends...if you are doing this on a wooden deck out back, DO have a fire extinguisher handy, and NOT water. Water merely makes burning oil flow all over the place. The local fire companies get several calls a year for well done decks. Much better to do this on a level driveway or a patio, several feet away from the house.
:wink:
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Re: Regional Delicacies

New postby spenny on Sun Aug 19, 2007 11:54 am

clockwork bluejay wrote: "Clinton caused ... the use of steroids in sports")


i had no idea! :)

i nominate scrapple.

mmm... scrapple.... gotta run to safeway now.
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Cincinnatti Delicacy

New postby clockwork bluejay on Sun Aug 19, 2007 12:59 pm

I heard a NPR food show a couple of weeks ago that mentioned a Cincinnatti German delicacy called goetta (pronounced "getta") composed of ground meat (pork and beef) and oatmeal. The raw ingredients are formed into a loaf then sliced into squares and fried. It sounded like "upscale" scrapple to me. Have any of the denizens of the WC tried this stuff?
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